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Yet another review of The Invisible Hand in Economics

Yet another review of The Invisible Hand in Economics

Warren J. Samuels’ review of The Invisible Hand in Economics kindly starts with the following sentence: This study by a sensitive and imaginative intellect is a substantive contribution to the literature  developing  the  meaning  of  the  concept  of  ‘‘the  invisible  hand’’  while simultaneously attempting to establish how interpretation can be structured to convey ‘‘understanding’’ albeit not ‘‘truth.’’ However, Samuels review is the most critical review I have recieved so far. You may read the full review here. If you are…

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Wade Hands’ Review of The Invisible Hand in Economics

Wade Hands’ Review of The Invisible Hand in Economics

Here is the last paragraph of Wade Hands’ review of The Invisible Hand in Economics (History of Political Economy 2010; 42: 388-390): “In summary, I found Aydinonat’s book to be a very important contribution to the literature. This is not to say that I would not quibble about specific details of his argument – but it does provide a very useful, and quite coherent, framework for thinking about the explanatory power and adequacy of invisible hand-type explanations. Such explanations are…

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“The Invisible Hand viewed and reviewed” by Edna Ullmann-Margalit

“The Invisible Hand viewed and reviewed” by Edna Ullmann-Margalit

Here are highlights from Edna Ullmann-Margalit’s review of my book: “The book’s choice of the topic with which economists and philosophers could start engaging each other cannot be improved on. The notion of the invisible hand, and the type of explanations it gives rise to, of social patterns of behavior as unintended consequences of individual actions and interactions, are just right for the cross-fertilization between a variety of philosophical fields, prominently including the philosophy of science, on one side, and…

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Review by Anna Alexandrova

Review by Anna Alexandrova

Here is the introduction to Anna Alexandrova‘s review of The Invisible Hand in Economics (forthcoming in Economics and Philosophy): “Where do social institutions and phenomena come from? A venerable tradition in economics seeks to explain some of these institutions and phenomena, for example, money, traffic rules, racial segregation and many others, using a concept of invisible hand. Such explanations show a phenomenon to be an unintended outcome of a multitude of actions and interactions of individual persons. In a book…

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A modification of inivisible-hand consequences?

A modification of inivisible-hand consequences?

Aki Lehtinen proposes a modification to my account of invisible-hand consequences. My account of invisible-hand consequences excludes unintended social consequences that were brought about by actions of individuals who were intending to bring about social consequences. Lehtinen argues that “the problem with this condition is that it is too strong: it rules out cases in which we are inclined to say that a model provides an invisible-hand account even though it violates the condition.” Here is what he says in…

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Review by Nicola Giocoli

Review by Nicola Giocoli

Here is a short review of The Invisible Hand in Economics by Nicola Giocoli: “Conjectural models aim at devising the initial conditions required for individual actions to generate a given social phenomenon as unintended consequence. Social scientists make frequent use of this modeling technique. Indeed the list of those who have applied it – from Smith to Menger, from Schelling to Lewis – reads likely a veritable “who’s who” of the last 250 years of social sciences. Yet the question…

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Review by Robert Sugden

Review by Robert Sugden

Here is a short review of The Invisible Hand in Economics by Robert Sugden: “There is a long tradition in the social sciences, going back to Adam Smith, of explaining social phenomena as the unintended consequences of human actions. In this illuminating book, Aydinonat investigates the structure of such explanations and the nature of the claims that can legitimately be derived from them. In the process, he analyses some of the classic ideas in social theory – Smith’s invisible hand,…

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