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HET Summer School in Ankara

HET Summer School in Ankara

The Summer School on History of Economic Thought, Economic Philosophy and Economic History was established in 1998 with the following aims: To provide a thematic and specialized formation to PhD students in these fields of study; To guarantee the diffusion and scientific assessment of their work; To provide new approaches and enhance knowledge in contemporary economic analysis; To introduce PhD students to trans-disciplinary perspectives in the social sciences. In line with this general approach, the Summer School is organized as follows: Workshops…

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Maghribi traders debate

Maghribi traders debate

I just realized that the debate concerning the Maghribi traders continues (see the previous post on this: Was Avner Greif right?). Avner Greif summarizes the debate here: Debate Regarding the Magrhibi Traders. He mentions the following two articles from the May 2012 issue of The Economic History Review — both are freely available from EHR’s web page (follow the links below): Contract enforcement, institutions, and social capital: the Maghribi traders reappraised (pages 421–444)– JEREMY EDWARDS and SHEILAGH OGILVIE PDF(197K) Abstract:…

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JEM Special Issue: Economics Made Fun

JEM Special Issue: Economics Made Fun

Journal of Economic Methodology Special Issue: Economics Made Fun Vol. 19, Issue 3, 2012 Editors: Jack Vromen & N. Emrah Aydinonat Contents: The paradox of popularity in economics Diane Coyle pages 187-192 DOI:10.1080/1350178X.2012.714141 A less-is-more approach to introductory economics Robert H. Frank pages 193-198 DOI:10.1080/1350178X.2012.714148 Finding the right levers: the serious side of ‘economics made fun’ Jack Vromen pages 199-217 DOI:10.1080/1350178X.2012.714150 On the philosophy of the new kiosk economics of everything Uskali Mäki pages 219-230 DOI:10.1080/1350178X.2012.714146 Economics is a serious…

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Is destruction intrinsically pleasurable?

Is destruction intrinsically pleasurable?

According to this paper, YES! (Of course, you knew this already.) Kessler, Esther & David Skuse (2012) Destructor Game, http://www.doctreballeco.uji.es/wpficheros/kessler_etal_2012.pdf Abstract: Destructive behavior has mostly been investigated by games in which all players have the option to simultaneously destroy (burn) their partners’ money. In the destructor game, players are randomly paired and assigned the roles of destructor versus passive player. The destructor player chooses to destroy or not to destroy a share of his passive partner’s earnings. The passive partner…

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The Experimental Economics of Religion

The Experimental Economics of Religion

The Experimental Economics of Religion Date: 2011-07 By: Robert Hoffmann URL: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/cedex/documents/papers/2011-07.pdf This article surveys the experimental economics approach to the study of religion. The field has a place in the context of the scientific study of religion generally and the social psychology of religion in particular, but employs distinct economic methods which promise new and different insights. In particular, certain features of the experimental approach as used by economists such as incentive compatibility are particularly appropriate for studying the…

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New Paper: Institutions, Economics and the Development Quest

New Paper: Institutions, Economics and the Development Quest

Institutions, Economics and the Development Quest Date: 2012-04 By: Duarte N. Leite, Sandra T. Silva, Óscar Afonso URL: http://www.fep.up.pt/investigacao/workingpapers/wp457.pdf Institutions, crucial for the analysis of how agents deal with uncertainty, have been gaining increasing relevance on the Economic research agenda. In this paper, we analyze the institutional literature that provides insights into different research fields, aiming to explain why this perspective obtains better results than others, in the field of growth and Development Economics. In particular, we stress the relevance…

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New Paper: Economic Models as Analogies by Itzhak Gilboa et. al.

New Paper: Economic Models as Analogies by Itzhak Gilboa et. al.

Gilboa, Itzhak; Andrew Postlewaite; Larry Samuelson & David Schmeidler (2011) “Economic Models as Analogies”, Penn Institute for Economic Research (PIER) Working Paper no.12-001, Online: http://d.repec.org/n?u=RePEc:pen:papers:12-001&r=cbe Abstract: People often wonder why economists analyze models whose assumptions are known to be false, while economists feel that they learn a great deal from such exercises. We suggest that part of the knowledge generated by academic economists is case-based rather than rule-based. That is, instead of offering general rules or theories that should be…

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